Alpine Young Guns: Mattia Casse

20 August 2012 10:03
photo private
photo private -
FIS

 

By Michael Mastarciyan

For Italian racer Mattia Casse - skiing at high speeds is more than just a sport or a pastime – it’s a birthright and way of life.

The son of Italian speed skier Alesandro Casse, who held the world record from 1971 to 1974 (184.237 km/h) , Casse admits he’s inherited his father’s hunger for extreme speed on snow, but instead of focusing on straight-lining he prefers the twists, turns and jumps involved in alpine events such as downhill and super-G.

“My father has had an influence on my choices, but since I was young I’ve loved to go fast,” Casse says.

An alpine missile on the slopes, Casse’s first big impact on the world stage was a gold in downhill and a bronze in super-G at the 2010 FIS Junior World Ski Championships held in France. Not long after, in January 2011, a Europa Cup 3rd place in GS at a race in Germany – a clear sign of more good things to come.

Then, last season, more success with six Europa Cup top 3’s in speed – one of them a victory in downhill.

But Casse’s winning ways didn’t stop there.

A speedster blessed with a fine technical touch, the 22-year-old from Oulx, Italy, also captured gold in super combined at Italian Nationals this past March. We caught up with Mr.Casse recently to discuss his penchant for speed and a few other things….

MM: Mattia, you love to go fast on snow just like your father Alessandro did in his sport, is speed in your blood?

MC: Yes for sure! Speed is inside me, speed is my life, my bible, my future!

MM: Have you ever tried Speed Skiing?

MC: No, never, but I would like to in the future

MM: What’s the fastest speed you’ve ever been clocked at?

MC: Wengen - 142km/h.

MM: What do you think is scarier, going fast in a straight line at 185km/h or 142 km/h downhill with bumps, turns and jumps?

MC: I think in a straight line at 185km/h.

MM: Speed is a part of your job, is it part of your life outside ski racing too? What else do you enjoy doing fast? Driving? Eating? Other things?

MC: As I said earlier, speed lives in me, in my daily life everything happens faster and, yes even when I’m eating !

MM: Your first big career moment came in France at the 2010 Junior Worlds, with gold in downhill and bronze in super-G, what was that experience like?

MC: It was encouraging for the future because it was there that I understood that winning was extremely satisfying, but to keep winning I would have to continue working very hard.

MM: You had a great Europa Cup season last year finishing second place in the super-G standings, with six podiums and your first victory on that circuit, that must have very exciting?

MC: For sure, it was more than just exciting, it was great! The best part for me was that I dedicated my first victory and my season to my Mum who passed away in March 2011.

MM: Did you have time to celebrate after your first Europa Cup victory?

MC: Yes of course, I celebrated with my teammates, my girlfriend and my best friends.

MM: You’ve had most of your success in downhill and super-G but have also done well in GS and super combined – do you consider yourself an all-rounder or a speed specialist?

MC: I prefer to be recognized as an all-rounded, but in any case I love speed and I want win in DH!

MM: Where will you do most of your racing this coming season – Europa Cup, World Cup, both?

MC: For sure in WC.

MM: Out of 37 World Cup starts you’ve had 8 top-30 finishes, what do you think you need to do to improve on this?

MC: I’m going to continue working hard but the most important thing for me is to gain more experience and to maintain a high level of concentration – which is tough because I’ve got a big head!

MM: You’ve raced at all the biggest downhill tracks in the world - Kitzbuehel, Wengen, Bormio, Val Gardena, Garmisch. Which one was your favourite and why?

MC: Kitzbuehel! Because it’s the best, the most famous, and the most exciting with an amazing show all around. In my opinion it’s the best DH in the world.

MM: What was it like looking down The Streif out of the start hut before your first run on it?

MC: First thing I thought was, “Please don’t kill me!” Then I calmed down and focused on finishing with a good time, going fast, and gaining experience for next year on The Streif because I want to win there some day!”

MM: What’s the most important thing you’ve learned in your career so far?

MC: NEVER BACK DOWN!

MM: What’s the best ski racing advice you’ve ever been given?

MC: The best that I received and I give is: Never fall down during a DH!

MM: Did you have any favourite ski racers growing up?

MC: Mathias Mayer

MM: If you could ride up a chairlift with any alpine ski racer who would it be and what would you talk about?

MC: It’s simple, with Bode Miller talking about his daily life outside of racing.

MM: If you could have dinner with any person living or dead who wasn’t an alpine ski racer, who would it be and what would you talk about?

MC: With my Dad, talking about life, past and future.

MM: Have you taken any vacation time off since the end of last season? Do anything exciting? Visit any beaches?

MC: Yes of course, I spent a week in Formentera, Spain, what an exciting island! But I’ve spent most of the off season training hard every day because I want to participate in the World Championships in Schladming.

MM: How is off-season training coming along?

MC: Never finished!


All photos private

ALPINE YOUNG GUNS: MATTIA CASSE
                                              By Michael Mastarciyan



For Italian racer Mattia Casse - skiing at high speeds is more than just a sport or a pastime – it’s a birthright and way of life.

The son of Italian speed skier Alesandro Casse, who held the world record from 1971 to 1974 (184.237 km/h)  , Casse admits he’s inherited his father’s hunger for extreme speed on snow, but instead of focusing on straight-lining he prefers the twists, turns and jumps involved in alpine events such as Downhill and Super G.

“My father has had an influence on my choices, but since I was young I’ve loved to go fast,” Casse says. 


An alpine missile on the slopes, Casse’s first big impact on the world stage was a  gold in Downhill and a bronze in Super G at the 2010 FIS Junior World Ski Championships held in France.

Not long after, in January 2011, a Europa Cup 3
rd place in GS at a race in Germany – a clear sign of more good things to come.

 

Then, last season, more success with six Europa Cup top 3’s in speed – one of them a victory in Downhill.

But Casse’s winning ways didn’t stop there.

A speedster blessed with a fine technical touch, the 22-year-old from Oulx, Italy, also captured gold in Super Combined at Italian Nationals this past March.

We caught up with Mr.Casse recently to discuss his penchant for speed and a few other things….


MM: Mattia, you love to go fast on snow just like your father Alessandro did in his sport, is speed in your blood?

MC: Yes for sure! Speed is inside me, speed is my life, my bible, my future!

MM: Have you ever tried Speed Skiing?

MC: No, never, but I would like to in the future

MM: What’s the fastest speed you’ve ever been clocked at?

MC: Wengen - 142km/h.

MM: What do you think is scarier, going fast in a straight line at 185km/h or 142 km/h downhill with bumps, turns and jumps?

MC: I think in a straight line at 185km/h.

MM: Speed is a part of your job, is it part of your life outside ski racing too? What else do you enjoy doing fast? Driving? Eating? Other things?

MC: As I said earlier, speed lives in me, in my daily life everything happens faster and, yes even when I’m eating !

MM: Your first big career moment came in France at the 2010 Junior Worlds, with gold in Downhill and bronze in Super G, what was that experience like?

MC: It was encouraging for the future because it was there that I understood that

winning was extremely satisfying, but to keep winning I would have to continue working very hard. 

MM: You had a great Europa Cup season last year finishing second place in the Super G standings, with six podiums and your first victory on that circuit, that must have very exciting?

MC: For sure, it was more than just exciting, it was great! The best part for me was that I dedicated my first victory and my season to my Mum who passed away in March 2011.

 

MM: Did you have time to celebrate after your first Europa Cup victory?

MC: Yes of course, I celebrated with my teammates, my girlfriend and my best friends.

MM: You’ve had most of your success in Downhill and Super G but have also done well in GS and Super Combined – do you consider yourself an all-rounder or a speed specialist?


MC: I prefer to be recognized as an all-rounded, but in any case I love speed and I want win in DH!

MM: Where will you do most of your racing this coming season – Europa Cup, World Cup, both?

MC: For sure in WC.

MM: Out of 37 World Cup starts you’ve had 8 top-30 finishes, what do you think you need to do to improve on this?

MC: I’m going to continue working hard but the most important thing for me is to gain more experience and to maintain a high level of concentration – which is tough because I’ve got a big head!


MM: You’ve raced at all the biggest downhill tracks in the world - Kitzbuehel, Wengen, Bormio, Val Gardena, Garmisch. Which one was your favourite and why?

MC:  Kitzbuehel !  Because it’s the best, the most famous, and the most exciting with an amazing show all around. In my opinion it’s the best DH in the world.

MM: What was it like looking down The Streif out of the start hut before your first run on it?

MC:
First thing I thought was, “Please don’t kill me!” Then I calmed down and focused on finishing with a good time, going fast, and gaining experience for next year on The Streif because I want to win there some day!”


MM: What’s the most important thing you’ve learned in your career so far?

MC: NEVER BACK DOWN!

MM: What’s the best ski racing advice you’ve ever been given?


MC: The best that I received and I give is: Never fall down during a DH!

MM: Did you have any favourite ski racers growing up?

MC: Mathias Mayer

MM: If you could ride up a chairlift with any alpine ski racer who would it be and what would you talk about?

MC: It’s simple, with Bode Miller talking about his daily life outside of racing.

MM: If you could have dinner with any person living or dead who wasn’t an alpine ski racer, who would it be and what would you talk about?

MC: With my Dad, talking about life, past and future.

MM: Have you taken any vacation time off since the end of last season? Do anything exciting? Visit any beaches?

MC: Yes of course, I spent a week in Formentera, Spain, what an exciting island! But I’ve spent most of the off season training hard every day because I want to participate in the World Championships in Schladming.


MM: How is off-season training coming along?

 

MC: Never finished!